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Can A Man Get A Vagina

by Annabel Caldwell
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Can A Man Get A Vagina

Can A Man Get A Vagina

During a vaginoplasty surgery, a surgeon creates both an outer and inner vagina by using skin and tissue from a penis. Your surgeon will use tissue from your foreskin to build the new opening of the vagina (also called the introitus).

A woman’s vagina is made up of three layers: The mucous membrane lining, the muscular wall surrounding it, and the skin. While most people have some notion that a vagina can be used for sexual intercourse, few realize just how complex a structure it really is. It has been said that a vagina was created for one thing only – reproduction. Nowadays, however, women are taking advantage of their newly-created sex organ in all sorts of ways. Some even prefer to get off with no help at all, while others enjoy performing oral sex on men or having lesbian sex with other women. In addition to its basic reproductive function, there are many variations of vaginal types, personalities, and preferences among women.
Vaginas come in different shapes and sizes. For example, they may range anywhere from 4 inches long to 8 inches long, but also vary in width. One of the reasons why this occurs is because there are so many factors involved when creating a vagina, including the general health of the person who will be using it. Women’s bodies are unique, as well. For instance, some women have very narrow vaginas, while others have wider ones. But whatever shape and size her vagina might have, one thing remains constant: Every vagina serves the same purpose – allowing menstrual flow into the uterus, where fertilized eggs can develop.
While not every man gets lucky enough to experience making love through his own vagina, there are some whose luck runs out. If you were born without a vagina, getting laid is something you never dreamt possible. However, if you’ve ever had thoughts about what it would feel like to make love through a vagina, you probably think nothing could stop you from trying it out. Well, you’ll learn more next time…
If you’re curious about what goes on behind closed doors between two consenting adults, keep reading!
Pregnancy Options:

What Is An Uterus?

The male orgasm

How does birth work?

How do babies get inside a mother’s womb?

Women’s Reproductive Systems:

Men’s and Women’s Organs Compared

In order to understand how a vagina works, we first need to compare them to each other. Here’s a quick rundown of the differences between a man’s penis and a woman’s vagina:
Penis vs. Vagina
Length: Penises tend to be longer than vaginas. On average, penises measure around 7 1/2 inches in length, whereas vaginas can range anywhere from 3 inches to 9 inches in length.
Taperedness: Men’s penises are tapered at the base, which allows semen to shoot out easily during ejaculation. This is not true of a woman’s vagina, though. Because a woman’s vagina is much shorter than a man’s penis, it doesn’t taper. Instead, it bulges outward toward the cervix.
Erections: Erection isn’t necessary for either gender; rather, erections occur naturally during sexual arousal.
Orgasm: Both genders climax sexually.
Semen: Sperm are produced exclusively by males. They travel down the epididymides located near the testicles. Once released into the urethra, sperm then enter the bladder and urinate out.
Urine: Male urine exits the body through the urethra, and female urine exits through the vagina.
Sexual Intercourse: Sexual intercourse involves penetration of a vagina by a penis.
Fertilization: Fertilization happens after sperm enters the uterus via the fallopian tubes.
Cervix: The cervix is the entrance to the upper part of the uterus. It opens into the vagina.
Ovaries: Ovaries produce eggs.
Womb: Wombs hold fetuses.
Menses: Menses are the release of blood cells from ovaries.

Now let’s take a look at some of the functions of the vagina:
Pregnancy Options:

The male orgasm

How does birth work?

How do babies get inside a mother’s womb?

Women’s Reproductive Systems:

Men’s and Women’s Organs Compared

Vaginal walls: There are four main parts to the vagina: the vulva, the vestibule, the canal, and the exterior portion of the vagina. These parts begin at the top and end at the bottom.
Labia majora: The labia majora are folds of skin found at the opening of the vagina. They form the lips of the vagina.
Labia minora: Labia minora are small folds of skin on the outside of the vagina. They serve to protect the internal organs, as well as provide additional support to the vaginal walls.
Clitoris: The clitoris is a large nub-like protrusion situated above the labia minora. It contains numerous nerve endings that cause intense sexual pleasure when stimulated.
G spot: Located deep within the vagina, the G spot is surrounded by spongy tissue that produces strong sensations. Stimulating the G spot requires more precision than stimulating the clitoris.
Urogenital sinus: Also known as the birth canal, the urogenital sinus is the passage formed by the fusion of the boy’s Wolffian ducts. As boys grow older, the urogenital sinus gradually closes until it disappears completely at puberty.
Epicondyle: Epicondyles are bumps that sit on the pubic bone. They connect the pelvis to the lower back.
Perineum: The perineum is a strip of muscle that extends diagonally across the anus and coccyx. It connects the pelvic region to the legs.
Rectum: The rectum is the final destination of waste matter expelled from the body.
Anal Canal: The anal canal begins at the tip of the coccyx and ends at the beginning of the rectum. Its sole job is to receive fecal material.
Genitals: Genitals refer to the external genitals such as the breasts, scrotum, and buttocks.

Here’s a closer look at a woman’s reproductive system:
Uterus: The uterus holds the fetus and provides nourishment through pregnancy. It stretches over time.
Fallopian Tubes: Also known as oviducts, fallopian tubes transport the egg from the ovary to the uterus.
Endometrium: Endometrium refers to the uterine lining. During menstruation, it becomes sloughed away. When a woman is pregnant, the endometrium thickens and swells.
Corpus Luteum: The corpus luteum forms in response to hormones secreted during the early stages of pregnancy. It secrete progesterone that helps regulate the process of labor.
Amniotic Sac: Amniotic sacs are fluid-filled cavities that surround the baby during pregnancy.
Placenta: Placentas are connected to the developing child by umbilical cord.
Nerve Fibers: Nerve fibers allow nerves to perform their jobs by communicating signals from the brain to various parts of the body.
Cord: Connects the placenta to the mother’s uterus.
Breast Feeding: Breast feeding is a natural way for mothers to feed their children.

Cervix: Cervices open to the vagina.
Ovaries: Ovaries produce eggs.
Wolffian Ducts: Also referred to as gonads, these glands give rise to the male reproductive organs.
Testes: Testes produce testosterone that stimulates development of masculine characteristics.
LH Levels: LH levels fluctuate throughout a woman’s monthly cycle. High levels occur before ovulation. Low levels occur shortly after menstruation.
Estrogen: Estrogens stimulate breast growth.
Prolactin: Prolactin is a hormone responsible for milk production.
Thyroid: Thyroids play important roles in metabolism. Their primary function is to control growth and development.
SHBG: SHBG is a protein that transports estrogen in the bloodstream.
RBCs: Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body.
Leukocytes: Leukocytes are white blood cells that fight infection.
Neutrophils: Neutrophils are the first type of immune cell to arrive at an injury site.
Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes are the second type of immune cell to arrive at an injury site.
Basophils: Basophils attack foreign invaders and infected tissues.
Eosinophils: Eosinophils are white blood cells that aid in fighting parasitic infections.
Monocytes: Monocytes are specialized macrophages that engulf invading pathogens.
Macrophages: Macrophages are special white blood cells that engulf damaged cells and cellular debris.
Bacteria: Bacteria are tiny organisms that live freely in nature. Most bacteria reside in our digestive tract.
Chemicals: Chemicals are substances that contain elements of life.
DNA: DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid. DNA stores genetic information that directs growth of living things.
RNA: RNA stands for ribonucleic acid. Like DNA, RNA

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