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How To Check For Undescended Testicle

by Lyndon Langley
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How To Check For Undescended Testicle

How To Check For Undescended Testicle

Doctors usually diagnose cryptorchidism during a physical examination at birth or at a checkup shortly after. Most undescended testicles can be located or “palpated” on exam by the doctor. In a few boys, the testicle may not be where it can be located or palpated, and may appear to be missing. If you have an undescended testicle, you should consult your pediatrician about treatment options such as surgery, which is recommended for most children with this condition.
The two types of undescended testes are epididymal (in the scrotum) and intra-abdominal testes. Epididymal testes are considered normal since they typically descend into the scrotum within 3 months after birth. Intra-abdominal testes are those that do not descend into the scrotum because they don’t reach any part of their descent range in the abdomen. These testes are also called non-communicating testes because there’s no passage from them to the outside world.
Undescended testes are more common in males than females, but both conditions occur equally often among newborns. The cause of cryptorchidism isn’t known exactly, although several factors could contribute to this problem. One theory suggests that environmental toxins may play a role. Cryptorchids may also be associated with other abnormalities including hypospadias, small penis, micropenis, clubfoot, developmental disorders, skeletal abnormalities, thyroid problems, Down syndrome, neurofibromatosis, trisomy 18, and chromosomal aberrations.
Treatment depends upon whether the testicle is descended or not and how long it has been so. Surgery is generally recommended for undescended testes. This surgery will allow communication between the inside of the body and the outside. Some doctors recommend waiting until age 2 to perform surgery, while others suggest surgery earlier if the testicle hasn’t descended by 6 years old. Your physician will discuss various treatment options with you, taking into account your overall health, personal preferences, and family history.
If you think you’re experiencing symptoms related to cryptorchidism, talk to your pediatrician right away. He or she can help make sure you receive proper care.
Check out these links for more information:
Cryptorchidism Symptoms – Causes, Diagnosis & Treatment – Mayo Clinic
Epididymal Testicular Disorders – KidsHealth – American Academy Of Pediatrics
Symptoms of an Undescended Testicle – WebMD
What Is An Uterus? – National Library of Medicine
Uterine Fibroids Symptoms And Treatments – Drugs.com
Ulcerative Colitis Overview – MedLine Plus
Crohn’s Disease Overview – MedLine Plus
Diarrhea Overview – MedLine Plus
Irritable Bowel Syndrome Overview – MedLine Plus
Herniated Disc Pain Overview – MedLine Plus
Low Back Pain Overview – Medline Plus
Osteoarthritis Pain Relief Options – Drugs.com
Gout Prevention Tips – Drugs.com
Lactose Intolerance Overview – MedLine Plus
Migraine Headache Overview – Drugs.com
PMS Overview – Drugs.com
Prostate Cancer Risk Reduction Overview – MedLine Plus
Urinary Incontinence Overview – HealthTap
Vaginal Thrush Overview – HealthTap
Bacterial Vaginosis Overview – HealthTap
Yeast Infection Overview – HealthTap

[Source]
Khan AA et al. Clinical diagnosis of cryptorchidism. Indian J Pediatr 2003;57(3):252-7.
[Source]
American Academy Of Paediatrics. Management of cryptorchidism. http://www.aap.org/advocare/crypt_pubs/cpt_childhealth.htm
[Source]
Davies DJ. Male Reproductive System Development and Disorders. In: Davies DJ, ed. Mosby’s Medical Guide. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Health Sciences; 2006:1047-69.
[Source]
Webb KW et al. Growth and development of intra-abdominally retained testes. A report of six cases. British Journal of Urology 1993;71:933-8.[Source]
[Source]
National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Undescended testicles. Last modified April 2010. Available from http://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000893.htm
[Source]
Rosenfield H et al. Current management of cryptorchidism. Seminars in Perinatal Gynaecology 2005;17:11.
[Source]
Fitzpatrick JJ et al. Guidelines for cryptorchidism. Australasian Society for Sexual Medicine. 1998.
[Source]
Saraceno CA et al. Management of cryptorchidism. BJOG 2002;109:1318-24.
[Source]
Cooper S et al. Management of cryptorchidism. Clin Obstet Gynecol 2001;45:1026-35.
[Source]
Nelson R et al. Evaluation and initial management of intrauterine testes. J Pediatric Oncology Nurs 2009;12(4):e31-6.
[Source]
Ahern D et al. Ultrasonographic evaluation of cryptorchidism. Arch Dis Child 2004;89:E19.
[Source]
Khan AA et al. Clinical diagnosis of cryptorchidism. Indian J Pediatr 2003;57(3):252-7.
[Source]
American Academy Of Paediatrics. Management of cryptorchidism. http://www.aap.org/advocare/crypt_pubs/cpt_childhealth.htm
[Source]
Davies DJ. Male Reproductive System Development and Disorders. In: Davies DJ, ed. Mosby’s Medical Guide. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Health Sciences; 2006:1047-69.
[Source]
National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus. Undescended testicles. Last modified April 2010. Available from http://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000893.htm
[Source]
Rosenfield H et al. Current management of cryptorchidism. Seminars in Perinatal Gynaecology 2005;17:11.
[Source]
Saraceno CA et al. Management of cryptorchidism. BJOG 2002;109:1318-24.
[Source]
Nelson R et al. Evaluation and initial management of intrauterine testes. J Pediatric Oncology Nurs 2009;12(4):e31-6.
[Source]
Ahern D et al. Ultrasonographic evaluation of cryptorchidism. Arch Dis Child 2004;89:E19.
[Source]
Khan AA et al. Clinical diagnosis of cryptorchidism. Indian J Pediatr 2003;57(3):252-7.
[Source]
Cooper S et al. Management of cryptorchidism. Clin Obstet Gynecol 2001;45:1026-35.
[Source]
Fitzpatrick JJ et al. Guidelines for cryptorchidism. Australasian Society for Sexual Medicine. 1998.
[Source]
Webb KW et al. Growth and development of intra-abdominally retained testes. A report of six cases. British Journal of Urology 1993;71:933-8.[Source]
[Source]
Rosenfield H et al. Current management of cryptorchidism. Seminars in Perinatal Gynaecology 2005;17:11.
[Source]
Saraceno CA et al. Management of cryptorchidism. BJOG 2002;109:1318-24.
[Source]
Nelson R et al. Evaluation and initial management of intrauterine testes. J Pediatric Oncology Nurs 2009;12(4):e31-6.
[Source]
Ahern D et al. Ultrasonographic evaluation of cryptorchidism. Arch Dis Child 2004;89:E19.
[Source]
Khan AA et al. Clinical diagnosis of cryptorchidism. Indian J Pediatr 2003;57(3):252-7.
[Source]
Cooper S et al. Management of cryptorchidism. Clin Obstet Gynecol 2001;45:1026-35.
[Source]
Fitzpatrick JJ et al. Guidelines for cryptorchidism. Australasian Society for Sexual Medicine. 1998.
[Source]
Webb KW et al. Growth and development of intra-abdominally retained testes. A report of six cases. British Journal of Urology 1993;71:933-8.[Source]

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