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How To Sleep With Torn Rotator Cuff

by Lyndon Langley
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How To Sleep With Torn Rotator Cuff

How To Sleep With Torn Rotator Cuff

If you have had a torn rotator cuff for any length of time, you know that it is extremely difficult to sleep at night without experiencing extreme pain. The problem lies in the fact that most people don’t understand how their body works while they are sleeping. If you want to get better results from restorative healing techniques like deep muscle relaxation therapy, you need to learn about how your body functions while you sleep so you can take advantage of this opportunity to heal yourself.
Your brain does not function all day long as if you were awake. Your brain shuts down during sleep and shifts into “recovery mode.” During this phase, your mind slows down allowing your conscious thoughts and emotions to relax. When you wake up, your brain is ready to be productive again because its energy levels are replenished. In short, when you sleep, your brain gets a break!
The same principle applies to your muscles and joints. Muscles do not work hard when you’re awake but rather when you move and engage them. They only operate efficiently when they are relaxed and are receiving no external stimuli. Just think about how tired you feel after exercising, even though you worked out much longer than usual. That’s because your muscles felt tense before you began working out. And just like your brain, your muscles also shut down while you sleep.
When you sleep, your shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, and knees receive little movement and stimulation. You should therefore expect your muscles to be weak and sore. It’s normal for your muscles to hurt when you first injure an area like a torn rotator cuff. However, if you continue to ignore these symptoms, they will become progressively worse over time.
What happens if you have a torn rotator cuff?
Tears occur in your rotator cuff due to trauma, repetitive motion, or degeneration caused by aging. Tears can range from minor dislocations (partial) to complete ruptures. Rupture of the supraspinatus tendon is the most common type of tear followed by tears of the infraspinatus and teres minor tendons. Ligaments may also rupture along with some tendons resulting in instability.
A torn rotator cuff can cause severe pain especially around the shoulder joint. Pain radiates down your arm and back towards your elbow which can make it very difficult to use your hand properly. Since the shoulder socket is surrounded by bursa sacs and cartilage, tearing of the rotator cuff can result in sudden and intense inflammation causing swelling, discomfort, stiffness, and tenderness.
Itching is another symptom associated with a torn rotator cuff. Tearing of your rotator cuff causes friction against the undersurface of your scapula which leads to irritation. Because of the constant rubbing and tugging at the undersurface of your scapula, skin becomes irritated and inflamed. The result is usually dry patches of eczema covering your scars.
Sleep tight!
How to deal with restless sleep following a torn rotator cuff
Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, is a condition characterized by uncomfortable feelings in your legs, particularly those near your ankles. People suffering from RLS experience unpleasant sensations such as itching, burning, crawling, numbness, tingling, heaviness, waking up suddenly, waking too often throughout the night, or feeling cold.
RLS affects approximately 10% to 20% of adults over the age of 60. Menopausal women are more likely to develop RLS whereas men are slightly more susceptible to developing Parkinson’s disease. Other conditions linked to RLS include iron deficiency, liver failure, kidney failure, pregnancy complications, chronic fatigue syndrome, stroke, cancer, diabetes mellitus, neurological disorders, anxiety disorders, depression, alcohol abuse, smoking, and medications used to treat certain medical conditions.
People who spend extended periods of time sitting or lying still may develop RLS. Individuals prone to developing RLS are recommended to avoid prolonged sedentary activities, limit caffeine intake, exercise regularly, eat well, drink plenty of water, and consider treating underlying conditions. A doctor may prescribe medication to relieve leg discomfort.
How to sleep with a torn rotator cuff
Sleeping comfortably with a torn rotator cuff depends upon the severity of the injury and whether surgery has been performed. Even if you’ve undergone surgery, you might find it difficult to sleep for several reasons. For example, you may have limited mobility due to a brace, stitches, and/or sling. Surgery may also disrupt your natural sleep cycle, leaving you tossing and turning through the night.
To help ease your insomnia, try falling asleep faster using one of the many effective methods available online. Alternatively, you could purchase one of our great hypnosis MP3 downloads to help you fall and stay asleep peacefully.
Here are two exercises you can perform to improve your ability to sleep comfortably while recovering from a torn rotator cuff.
Exercise 1 – Sleeping Comfortably
Lie on your back with arms stretched above your head. Tighten your stomach muscles then exhale slowly while contracting your abdominal muscles. Relax your abdomen then inhale deeply until your rib cage expands fully. Repeat this process five times. Next, contract your abs repeatedly until you feel tension release from your lower back. Then repeat the process until you achieve total relaxation. Once you achieve full relaxation, count backwards from 100 by 7’s in groups of 3. Count backwards all the way down to 7 using your breath to guide you. Make sure to keep your eyes closed. After counting backwards, go ahead and close your eyes. Breathe calmly until you begin to drift into a light sleep.
Exercise 2 – Sleeping Comfortably
Sit upright in a chair wearing comfortable clothes. Keep your feet flat on the floor and place your hands palms down on either thigh. Close your eyes and breathe calmly. Begin to count backward from 100 in groups of 7 starting with 799. Continue counting backwards until you reach 0. At this point, begin relaxing your shoulders. Take your right hand and stretch across your chest toward your left shoulder to loosen your shoulder blades. Hold this pose for 5 seconds and then switch sides. Do this for each shoulder. Once finished, begin breathing normally. Count forward from 100 in groups of 7 starting with 700. Continue doing this until you reach 25. Now open your eyes. Try counting silently for 10 seconds. Start breathing normally again. While continuing to count forward from 100 in groups of 7 start with 75. Keep doing this for 30 counts. Once finished, begin relaxing your shoulders. Take your right hand and stretch across your chest toward your left shoulder to loosen your shoulder blades. Hold this pose for 5 seconds and then switch sides. Do this for each shoulder. Once finished, begin breathing normally. Count forward from 100 in groups of 7 starting with 750. Continue doing this until you reach 50. Now open your eyes. Try counting silently for 8 counts. Start breathing normally again. While continuing to count forward from 100 in groups of 7 start with 850. Continue doing this for 40 counts. Once finished, begin relaxing your shoulders. Take your right hand and stretch across your chest toward your left shoulder to loosen your shoulder blades. Hold this pose for 5 seconds and then switch sides. Do this for each shoulder. Once finished, begin breathing normally. Count forward from 100 in groups of 7 starting with 900. Continue doing this for 35 counts. Once finished, begin relaxing your shoulders. Take your right hand and stretch across your chest toward your left shoulder to loosen your shoulder blades. Hold this pose for 5 seconds and then switch sides. Do this for each shoulder. Once finished, begin breathing normally. Count forward from 100 in groups of 7 starting with 925. Continue doing this for 25 counts. Once finished, begin relaxing your shoulders. Take your right hand and stretch across your chest toward your left shoulder to loosen your shoulder blades. Hold this pose for 5 seconds and then switch sides. Do this for each shoulder. Once finished, begin breathing normally. Count forward from 100 in groups of 7 starting with 950. Continue doing this for 15 counts. Once finished, begin relaxing your shoulders. Place both thumbs under your chin and curl your fingers upward toward your forehead. Gently pull your chin upwards towards your throat. Hold this pose for 5 seconds then release. Repeat this sequence three times. Finish relaxing your shoulders. Lie quietly in bed now.
Drink lots of fluids before going to bed. Drinking fluids helps prevent dehydration. Dehydration makes it harder to fall asleep and increases the risk of having bad dreams. Avoid caffeinated beverages including tea, coffee, colas, chocolate, etc., late at night. These stimulants may leave you jittery and unable to sleep. Alcoholic drinks dehydrate you, making it more difficult to fall asleep and increasing the chances you’ll dream.
Avoid smoking before going to bed. Smoking reduces oxygen flow to your lungs, reducing your ability to absorb nutrients. Nicotine is a stimulant that keeps your heart rate elevated. Smoking cigarettes releases nicotine into your bloodstream which stays active for hours after you smoke.
Eat lightly before going to bed. Eating heavy meals stimulates digestion. Digestion takes place during the middle of the night when your digestive system is inactive.

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