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What Drinks Help With Nausea

by Clara Wynn
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What Drinks Help With Nausea

What Drinks Help With Nausea

What Drinks Help With Nausea? Nausea is an unpleasant side effect that many people experience when they take certain medications, have food poisoning, get sick with flu or cold viruses, or suffer from morning sickness during pregnancy. It can also occur due to motion sickness and other causes. In some cases it may be caused by eating too much spicy foods, alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, chocolate, or certain vegetables, or even emotional factors like stress.

When you feel nauseated, your body sends signals to alert you that something isn’t right. For example, you may start to sweat; your heart rate increases; you might become dizzy or faint. Your eyes may roll back into your head. You may vomit without any warning signs or changes in consciousness. If this happens, lie down immediately until you’re better.

You should never eat anything while suffering from nausea. However, if you’re vomiting, try not to purge (throw up) because the act could cause serious injury to your stomach lining and lead to peritonitis, which is a type of infection of the abdominal wall muscles, leading to severe internal bleeding and possibly death.

If you feel lightheaded but aren’t vomiting, drink plenty of fluids to keep yourself hydrated. A good rule of thumb for adults who don’t have diabetes: Drink eight ounces of fluid every hour. This will help replace fluids lost through vomiting. Avoid drinks high in sugar, alcohol, and caffeinated beverages, since these tend to dehydrate you further. Caffeine actually makes dehydration worse, so avoid coffee, soda, and energy drinks. Also steer clear of hot peppers, onion, and garlic — all known emetics (releases substances from within the digestive tract).

Sickness often lasts three days or less, but occasionally it can last longer than that. The sooner you seek medical attention, the faster treatment can begin.
There are several types of medication available to relieve nausea symptoms.

These include antiemetic drugs, which prevent nausea; antinausea drugs, used to suppress nausea already present; and antihistamines, which reduce allergy-related discomfort associated with nausea. Over-the-counter remedies include ginger candies, peppermint oil capsules, chamomile teas, vitamin B6 supplements, and ginger root capsules. Some herbs that work against nausea include feverfew, black cohosh, scullcap, valerian, and kava.

Read on to learn what foods you can eat when you’re experiencing nausea.

Foods That Can Cause Nausea

Certain foods can make you queasy. Here’s a short list:

  • spicy foods, including soy sauce, chili powder, curry spices, mustard, Tabasco® sauce, horseradish, wasabi, and MSG (monosodium glutamate)
  • alcoholic drinks, especially beer, wine, and liquor
  • carbonated beverages, including pop, carbonated water, soft drinks, tonic water, ginger ale, ginger beer, and sodas
  • foods containing nitrates, such as pickled herring, ham, hot dogs, salami, bologna, bacon, canned meats, cured sausage, processed deli meat, lunchmeats, dried soup mixes, and smoked fish

Some people find that their nausea improves after meals. Others find that avoiding those specific foods relieves them completely. Try experimenting to see what works best for you. There is no one “right” way to treat nausea.

Keep reading to discover how to prepare foods that are safe for you when you’re feeling nauseous.

Eating when you’re nauseated can be dangerous. To protect your health, follow the simple steps below:

  • Avoid large meals, which can slow digestion. Eat smaller amounts more frequently.
  • Drink 8 glasses of noncaffeinated fluids each day.
  • Stay away from alcohol, cigarettes, and highly caffeinated or sugary snacks.
  • Take small sips of clear liquids, rather than swallowing whole.
  • Eat bland foods, such as rice cakes, crackers, toast, cereal, potatoes, bananas, applesauce, jello, chicken broth, and oatmeal.
  • Try chewing gum or sucking hard candy.
  • Don’t smoke or chew tobacco products.
  • Avoid fatty foods, greasy foods, fried foods, and foods rich in salt and sodium.
  • Limit salty snack foods.
  • Avoid citrus fruits and juices, tomatoes, onions, raw carrots, celery, vinegar, and tomato sauce.
  • Do not ingest dairy products.
  • Do not use over-the-counter medications unless directed to do so by your doctor.
  • Do not exercise strenuously.
  • Exercise moderation.

See your doctor promptly if nausea occurs along with any combination of the following symptoms: chest pain, difficulty breathing, numbness, fainting, confusion, tingling sensations, weakness, headache, visual problems, or diarrhea.

Aspirin taken at regular intervals may alleviate nausea. Ask your doctor about aspirin therapy.

Loperamide (Imodium AD) reduces gastrointestinal distress and speeds gastric emptying.

Chlorpromazine (Thorazine HCL) decreases nausea and vomiting.

Benzodiazepines calm anxiety and induce sleep. Diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), nordiazepam (Sonata), and flurazepam (Dalmane) are examples.

Cimetidine (Tagamet HB) slows gastric secretion and thins mucus, making it easier for the stomach to fight off germs causing food poisoning. It has few side effects. Side effects include dry mouth, constipation, flatulence, weight loss, drowsiness, and unusual dreams.

H1 antagonists block histamine receptors in the intestinal walls. Cholinergic blockers block acetylcholine receptors. Zinc supplements may decrease nausea.

Hydroxyzine (Vistaril) relaxes smooth muscle tissue that helps regulate blood pressure. Taken orally, Hydroxyzine blocks both central and peripheral nervous system activity that causes nausea.

Phenothiazines share similar chemical properties with tricyclics and tranquilizers. Phenothiazines affect brain function and inhibit sympathetic nerve impulses. Prothionamide interferes with cell membranes and disrupts bacterial growth.

Thiethylperazine (Tefarol) is an oral antipsychotic drug that belongs to the phenothiazine family. Thiethylperazine is effective in treating schizophrenia and preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Leukotrienes are chemicals produced by white blood cells that trigger inflammation and allergic reactions. Leukotriene inhibitors reduce inflammation and can decrease nausea and vomiting. Drugs that interfere with leukotriene production include zafirlukast (Accolate), montelukast (Singulair), pranlukast (Airify), and MK-886 (Orudis).

NSAIDs are analgesics (pain killers) that reduce inflammation. Ibuprofen (Advil) and naproxen sodium (Naprosyn) belong to this group. They can cause nausea and vomiting. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) does not cause significant gastric irritation or acid reflux.

Acute nausea is usually temporary and responds readily to treatment. Read on for tips and home remedies to ease nausea symptoms.
The average person swallows between 4 and 6 quarts (3.7 liters) of air per day!

Home Remedies for Nausea

People often turn to home remedies to alleviate nausea. Since there are dozens of potential triggers for nausea, the best remedy sometimes depends upon where you live, what season it is, what time of year it is, and where you work.

When experimenting with home remedies, remember that natural doesn’t always mean benign. Be sure to check with your physician before trying any new medicines or treatments.

Here are a few general guidelines to consider regarding home remedies for nausea:

  • avoid alcoholic and caffeinated beverages
  • drink lots of fluids, particularly water
  • eat bland foods
  • try taking a warm shower instead of a bath
  • stay out of drafts
  • sit upright
  • lie down early
  • take frequent breaks outside
  • keep a cool damp cloth handy
  • get enough rest
  • try acupressure points, herbal remedies, or acupuncture
  • exercise regularly
  • breathe fresh air
  • relax
  • listen to soothing music
  • massage
  • meditate
  • use aromatherapy oils

For relief of nausea related to motion sickness, try putting your head between your knees and leaning forward slightly. Keep your body relaxed. Wear sunglasses and avoid driving.

To read more about nausea, its causes, cures, and prevention, visit the links on the next page.

In addition to having an adverse reaction to medicine, nausea can result from infections of the ear, nose, throat, or lungs. Infections of the upper respiratory system can spread to the sinuses and ears. Viral infections, such as influenza, commonly cause nausea and vomiting.

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