Home Sexual Health What To Do When You Cut Your Vag On The Inside

What To Do When You Cut Your Vag On The Inside

by Annabel Caldwell
0 comment
What To Do When You Cut Your Vag On The Inside

What To Do When You Cut Your Vag On The Inside

Vaginal cuts or tears can occur during pubic hair removal and sexual activity. Vaginal delivery during childbirth can also cause wounds in the tissues inside and surrounding the vagina. Minor vaginal cuts or tears can cause pain and discomfort, but they generally heal without treatment within a few days. Keeping the affected area clean and dry can help the wounds heal and prevent infection. More significant cuts or tears may require medical attention. See a doctor if the cuts are deep, numerous, or do not stop bleeding.

Vaginal cuts or tears can occur during pubic hair removal and sexual activity. Vaginal delivery during childbirth can also cause wounds in the tissues inside and surrounding the vagina. Minor vaginal cuts or tears can cause pain and discomfort, but they generally heal without treatment within a few days. Keeping the affected area clean and dry can help the wounds heal and prevent infection. More significant cuts or tears may require medical attention. See a doctor if the cuts are deep, numerous, or do not stop bleeding.
Wounds that bleed excessively or refuse to heal after several days should be evaluated by your health care provider. A physical examination will determine whether you need further testing such as X-rays or laboratory tests. In addition to cleaning and drying the wound, taking over-the-counter medications for pain and keeping it elevated above the heart helps reduce swelling. Wound cleansing with soap and water is usually sufficient to treat minor injuries. If the cut involves an internal organ, administer medication such as hydrogen peroxide to kill any germs on or in the body tissue. Keep all bandages and sutures clean and dry. After treating a vaginal laceration, seek immediate medical attention if:
The injury causes severe bleeding that doesn’t stop after washing and cleansing.
You have signs of shock (dizziness, clammy skin) or breathing problems (shortness of breath, chest pain).

Your partner has sustained serious injury from the accident.

A sharp object penetrated the vagina, rectum, urethra, or anus.

A foreign substance entered the vagina or other opening.

Bleeding occurs around the genitals or elsewhere in the body.

If you experience any sign of these symptoms, contact emergency services immediately. Otherwise, follow these steps to relieve pain and keep the wound healthy:
Keep the injured area clean and dry. Use moistened cloths instead of paper towels because they absorb more liquid than dry ones. Don’t use cotton balls because they can become saturated with blood.

Take acetaminophen (Tylenol, Excedrin) for fever; ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) for moderate pain; aspirin or naproxen (Aleve) for severe pain. Never give aspirin to children under age 16 unless directed by their physician.

Apply pressure to slow down bleeding. Try to elevate the damaged area above the level of the heart to minimize fluid buildup.

Call 911 or go to an emergency room if:
Blood loss becomes heavy enough to cause fainting.

Signs of shock develop, including cold sweat, rapid heartbeat, dilated pupils, weak pulse, nausea, dizziness, blurred vision.

Pain increases suddenly or does not improve after 24 hours.

Swelling is extreme or rapidly spreading.

Any part of the body hurts that wasn’t injured.

The person’s condition changes suddenly for no apparent reason.

Seek medical attention immediately if you have been sexually assaulted. Signs of rape include:
Abuse involving penetration when the victim is incapable of giving consent due to drinking alcohol or using drugs.

Penetration through clothing or into the skin.

Force used against a victim who is physically helpless or incapacitated and unable to fight back.

Using threats or violence to obtain sex.

Sexual intercourse with someone who cannot give informed consent.

When seeking medical attention, inform doctors about the nature of the injury and how it occurred. They’ll want to know what happened so they can take appropriate precautions while diagnosing and treating you. For example, a nurse might ask you questions about how the injury occurred and where you were at the time. Or, you could tell them yourself.
Treatment depends upon the severity of the injury and varies according to each patient’s needs. Treatment options include:
Clean the wound thoroughly and apply antiseptic ointment. Then cover it with a loose bandage.

For superficial injuries, stitches are unnecessary. However, stitching deeper layers together can strengthen the tissues.

In some cases, a procedure called “primary repair” is needed to close a tear. Surgeons use dissolving materials to seal the edges of the wound. This minimizes scarring.

Other treatments include antibiotics to prevent infection, drainage tubes to remove fluids built up in the wound, and hysterectomy to repair damage to the uterus.

Aspirin therapy can sometimes control bleeding associated with uterine artery embolization. But its effectiveness is debatable.

Toothpaste can ease cramps caused by menstrual periods. Rubbing petroleum jelly on the vulva before shaving can soften hairs for easier removal. Also, shave daily to allow skin cells to grow back faster. Shaving too often irritates sensitive areas.

If you enjoyed reading this article and would like to see similar ones.
Please click on this link!

You may also like

Leave a Comment