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Why Do I Queef So Much

by Kristin Beck
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Why Do I Queef So Much

Why Do I Queef So Much

“Ladies, have you ever queefed? It’s a natural phenomenon that happens when your urethra is under pressure — like when you’re having sex or doing something strenuous like running. You’ll know because the sound will resemble an exaggerated farting noise.
It sounds disgusting, but it’s actually pretty common for women to experience this involuntary sound during various activities. In fact, most of us have done so at least once in our lives. We don’t really understand why we make these noises, but they usually stop as soon as we take a break.
There are plenty of theories about what causes them, though none has been proven definitively. Some people believe that it could be related to fluid buildup from exercising, while others say it might be due to sexual arousal. Anecdotally, many people who experience frequent queefs report that they were able to reduce their frequency after going on birth control pills. However, research shows that hormonal changes caused by contraception aren’t likely to trigger a sudden increase in flatulence.
In general, when the muscles surrounding your urethra contract involuntarily, it can cause some discomfort similar to passing gas. If it occurs frequently enough over time, you might even start to associate it with certain situations, such as running or being intimate with someone new. This can make it more noticeable than if it happened only occasionally.
If you’ve never experienced a queef before, here are some things to keep in mind. First off, it’s normal! Everyone makes funny noises in the bathroom; it doesn’t mean you need to see a doctor right away. Your queef is just another one of those quirks of life. Second, it’s also nothing to worry too much about. While it might seem embarrassing, you probably won’t get teased about it at school. (Though your teachers may find other ways to deal with excessive farts.) Third, remember that everyone gets queefs — even men. And lastly, try to enjoy yourself without thinking too hard about it. There’s no reason to fret about it. Just relax and accept it for what it is.
Here are some tips to help you cope with queefs:
Try drinking water. When queefs occur, you may feel nauseated or bloated. To avoid these uncomfortable feelings, drink lots of fluids throughout the day to combat dehydration. Avoid alcohol and caffeine, which dehydrate you further. Instead, opt for healthy beverages like sparkling water or herbal tea with lemon.
Exercise regularly. Exercising can lead to increased levels of carbon dioxide in your body, which sometimes triggers queefs, according to Dr. Emily Morse, MD, an obstetrician-gynecologist based in New York City. “”The higher your heart rate, the more CO2 you produce,”” she says. “”You can run out of oxygen, and then you can pass out.”” She recommends keeping track of how often you exercised over the past few days, and pay attention to any symptoms that come up. If you notice queefing, take breaks from your workout until your symptoms go back down.
Avoid constrictive clothing items. Tight pants or underwear can irritate your vaginal area, causing queefing. Wear loose fitting clothes instead.
Limit stressors. Stressful events can bring on queefing episodes, explains Dr. Morse. For example, if you had a bad work performance, or got into a car accident, you can blame your queefs on those occurrences. “”People tend to think, ‘I didn’t eat anything today,’ or ‘I must have drank too much coffee,’ but it was all in my head,”” Dr. Morse says. “”They weren’t real.”” If you want to avoid future queefing incidents, try to limit your stressors.
Don’t sweat it. Although queefing can be triggered by physical activity, it can also happen by itself. Many people confuse the two scenarios, but they’re actually very different. “”When you exercise, your muscles are tightening around the urethra, making it harder for air to move through,”” Dr. Morse says. As a result, you may feel the urge to let one rip, but it simply isn’t possible. But if you suddenly feel queasy or lightheaded, you should check in with your healthcare provider immediately. These symptoms could indicate that you’re dehydrated, and therefore your queefs could be occurring by themselves.
Accept that queefs happen. Acceptance is key. Try to embrace your queefs rather than fight against them. “”We’re afraid to talk about it, and that keeps it secret,”” says Dr. Morse. “”But it’s OK to laugh about it!”” ”

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